International Students Gave Up From U.S Schools

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#China #covid-19 news #intenational student #student #student protest #U.S

American colleges and universities, still reeling from the coronavirus, now expect to lose hundreds of thousands of foreign students over the inability of the country to combat the pandemic, the complexities of electronic schooling, and an increasingly aggressive U.S. administration.

Also at stake: the international students invest billions of dollars annually in the economy, plus the academic resources of having trained many of the world’s best and brightest minds in America.

About 1.1 million students from other nations come to the U.S. for college or professional educational programs, according to the new Open Doors survey released by the Institute for International Learning, where the U.S. State Department helps. According to the latest Study, which looks at the 2018-2019 academic year, these students spend more than $40 billion a year in the U.S.

But most of the students come from countries that have had far better control over their coronavirus outbreaks than the U.S. has, and the government was less welcoming here.

Jessica Sarles-Dinsick, Columbia University’s Associate Dean of International Programs and Special Projects, said she expects about 30-40 percent of international students may not come to the U.S. this year. That could cost nearly 400,000 students to colleges, and about $15 billion to the American economy.

Safety sign on campus due to COVID-19

Sarles-Dinsick said that the difficulties of students to receive visas during a pandemic, and fears about the epidemic itself, could harm America in several respects.
“The long tradition of accepting foreign students from the United States has created an opportunity to express the best image of who we are as a society, and to attract new residents and people for either the short or long term,” she said. “Including foreign students as an integral part of the school system encourages creativity and brings energy to our community as a whole.”

The hit was not going to come at the wrong time. When American students question whether to participate, schools have been strained by the increasing costs of going online and the decline of campus accommodation income and increased attendance.

Boston, MA 7/13/2020 Attorney General Maura Healey (cq) and international students rally at the State House against ICE visa rules that would potentially remove students from the country or prevent others from reentry, weeks before the fall semester begins, during the coronavirus pandemic. (Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff) Reporter: Laura Krantz

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Jalia Hatcher, a freshman at the University of Pittsburgh, tries to find a room in a car for her box of stuff she was removing from her dorm and moving to her home in Harisburg. With her grandmother, Perrise Saludhin, who was helping to fit everything in the car. Jalia is a biology and medical anthropology major at Pitt. (Darrell Sap/Post-Gazette)

Never before has there been an effect like coronavirus, said Suzanne E. Beech, a human geography professor at Ulster University in Northern Ireland, and the author of a book about how students make international school choices. “I expect that there would be a genuinely substantial decrease in the number of students directly in the near term,” she said.

Beech said that U.K. universities, like those in the U.S., have been dependent on foreign students who don’t pay a subsidized price for their tuition.

“There is a lot of concern about ‘What’s going to happen to those students? ‘And’ Where are they going? “said Beech. “So, ‘Do they return in the same numbers?

Theo Kang, the 31-year-old co-founder of Lighthouse Academy, a Beijing-based international education advisory firm, said both parents and students had expressed anxiety about studying in the U.S. since April due to “two big reasons. Another is the powerful China-U.S. present-day. Relationship and health issues are another.’

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These include worries about U.S. coronavirus outbreaks, growing anti-Chinese xenophobia, and widespread shooting reports, which are considered unusual in China due to its strict gun control regulations.

After the onset of the pandemic, President Trump has repeatedly referred to COVID-19 as a “Chinese epidemic.” Journalists were removed from both countries in March, and several months later, the U.S. forced China to shut its consulate in Houston, Texas. China took retaliatory measures to shutter the U.S. embassy in Chengdu, in southwestern China.

And it is not just Chinese students who were made to feel insecure in the United States. The Trump administration announced early last month that it would prohibit foreign students from even getting their education online. Harvard and MIT filed a complaint alleging that the federal government was seeking to push colleges to reopen because that was unacceptable.

Any of Kang’s graduates had wound up in American universities before the pandemic. “Seventy percent of our current students now consider and continue applying for schools in the U.K., Singapore, and certain European countries,” said Kang, whose organization supports around 100 students a year.
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In July, a survey of about 600 prospective international students by World Education Services found that if classes were only online, 38 percent would be enrolling in an American university. Another 32 percent would not be enrolling, and the others would not have decided.

Molly McSweeney, a global educator who collaborated with Sarles-Dinsick on a paper aiming to predict foreign student attendance, said the attractiveness of an American education remains high in several parts of the world. That the schools were opened on Sundays, she added. And some families sell what they’ve got to send a youth to an American college. “To get that opportunity, the students and their families go to great lengths,” she said. But none of that matters if the government feels the students are being shut out.

Qing Li, 23, from northern China’s Baoji, wanted to become a first-year law student at the law school at Washington University. He had scheduled a visa appointment at the U.S. embassy in Shenyang, China, but a week before his appointment, he received an email for cancellation. He demanded a one-year deferment of his curriculum at the end of July and was accepted the same day by the board. Li said he didn’t want to take the lessons online.

“Class interactions may not be a major issue for students studying maths or computer science,” Li said. “As for the law professors, it’s just class engagement.”
He was also concerned about 15-hour time discrepancies between China and Seattle, which would have meant attending midnight-dawn lectures.

Another first-year law student at Minnesota University, Ethan Cheng, 22, from Beijing, China, had arranged three visa appointments, but the U.S. embassy canceled them all. He’d already spent around $300 earlier this month for a scalper to book a visa appointment.

“I quit,”

According to a National Foundation for American Policy report, the fall enrollment of new foreign students could hit its lowest point since the end of World War II, which warns enrollment “is expected to decline 63 percent to 98 percent from 2018-19.”

Many American universities do what they can to make the numbers higher.

Cornell University collaborated with a dozen universities, including Peking University in China and Accra University, in Ghana as students faced travel constraints and visa delays. Students will lecture and live on these campuses when taking online courses from Cornell through its Study Away program.

said Cheng, who deferred one semester of his program. “I’m able to bring with me personal protection gear and take the opportunity to attend the school this fall. So I can’t go to school without a visa.’
These combination systems are intended to attract students and inspire them to come to America while the exposure of coronavirus is reduced.

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In July, a survey of about 600 prospective international students by World Education Services found that if classes were only online, 38 percent would be enrolling in an American university. Another 32 percent would not be enrolling, and the others would not have decided.

Molly McSweeney, a global educator who collaborated with Sarles-Dinsick on a paper aiming to predict foreign student attendance, said the attractiveness of an American education remains high in several parts of the world. Some countries have such a low college enrollment capacity that they opened schools on Sundays, she said. And some families sell what they’ve got to send a youth to an American college.

“To get that opportunity, the students and their families go to great lengths,” she said.

The U.S. ordered China to close its consultant in Hoston, Texas.

But none of that matters if the government feels the students are being shut out.
Qing Li, 23, from Baoji in northern China, wished to become a law student for the first year at the law school at the University of Washington. He had arranged a visa consultation at the U.S. embassy in Shenyang, China, but a week before his meeting, he received an invitation requesting cancelation. He applied for a one-year deferment of his curriculum in late July and was accepted by the school the same day. Li said he hadn’t decided to take courses online.

“The connections between classes should not be a major problem for students learning math or computer science,” Li said. “But, participation in the class is all for law students.”

Source: USA TODAY

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